Soham Rail Disaster

Completion Date: 2007

Location: Soham, Cambridgeshire

Material: Portland Stone

Detail: Bespoke stone with sloped top and recess panel for bronze plaque, with inscription hand cut and painted black.

The Soham rail disaster occurred on 2 June 1944, during the Second World War, when a fire developed on the leading wagon of a heavy ammunition train. The wagon contained a quantity of high explosive bombs. The train crew had detached the wagon from the rest of the train and were drawing it away when the cargo exploded. The fireman of the train and the signalman at Soham signalbox were killed and several other people injured. The driver, Benjamin Gimbert, and fireman, James Nightall, were both awarded the George Cross for preventing further damage which would have occurred if the rest of the train had exploded.

We were approached in 2007 by the Soham Community History Museum to create a bespoke memorial to the disaster, which was unveiled by the Duke of Gloucester on 2nd June 2007.

The Portland stone memorial featured a recessed panel for an inlaid bronze plaque, depicting interpretive artwork of the damaged train as well as text detailing the incident.


We are very pleased with our choice and with the quality of the workmanship. We were also impressed with the service provided by all the staff we have had contact with at Ivett & Reed.

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